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8 Ways To Photograph Kids For The Best Pictures

An article posted in All Posts on Oct 03, 2018

They wriggle, they squiggle, and they squirm. Kiddos are notoriously tough to photograph. And that’s okay. There’s no rule saying that every photo of your child needs to be “picture perfect.” Whether you have a toddler tornado who is constantly in motion, a precocious preschooler who would rather make a super-silly face than sweetly smile or a tearful tot who can’t stop crying every time the camera comes out, you can still take a great picture of your child.

Before you start snapping away, check out these easy-to-follow ideas for upping your photo game and taking the best possible pics of your kid. And bonus, when you finally find photography fabulousness, you can add the products of your effort to a fun family photo book.

Create candids

Sometimes posed pics are an impossibility. Instead of wrangling the kids into set seating, snap pictures where they are. There’s something to be said for catching those priceless memories. Even though the dog spraying muddy water all over the kids, your 2-year-old covered from head to toe in finger paint and your preschooler sitting on top of a mountain of would-be clean laundry may not seem Instagrammable, these are all candids that capture your life — and your loves!

Bring out the toys

When your baby or tot just won’t pay attention to the camera, hold up a favorite plaything. Shake, move or dance the toy around near your camera or have another adult do the honors. The toy will grab your kiddo’s attention, making it look like their staring directly into the camera.

Squat down

Get down on your child’s level. This tactic will grab your kiddo’s attention and put their pics in perspective. Whether you squat, sit, kneel or crawl along with them, lowering your body position can bring a comfort level to the photo session that makes the picture-taking easier on everyone.

Change locations

Your toddler is throwing a tantrum. A change of scenery can change your kiddo’s mood — almost immediately. Switch rooms, move from inside to outside or head to the local park for a few playful pics.

Catch your child unaware

Pointing out the camera and asking your child to smile may get you the opposite reaction from what you’re going for. Instead of saying, “Look at mommy and smile,” just wait for your tot to giggle on their own. Catch them mid-laugh or sneak a snap during a silent smile. Not only will this cut down on the photo frustration but you’ll get a more natural looking picture.

Join in

Photography is a fun-filled family activity. If the kids aren’t cooperating, jump in and join them in the pictures. Snap group selfies or ask another family member, spouse or friend to take a few parent-child photos. Having you in the picture may make your child feel more relaxed, creating a playful environment that leads to absolutely adorable family pics.

Play a game

Turn the photo session into a playful game. Sitting quietly while mom or dad takes pics just isn’t fun for most children. Play follow the leader, Simon Says or another game as you snap away. If your kiddo won’t sit still, challenge them to play the role of a statue. Every time you say the word “statue,” they have to freeze until you tell them to move again.

Include an activity

Asking your child to sit in a chair and smile isn’t exactly an action-packed or exciting activity. Give your kiddo something to do while you snap away. Bring out the finger paints, start a puzzle, roll a ball, give them blocks to build with or hand over a book for your kiddo to page through. The activity angle will help to create a sweet pic that tells the story of their everyday.

We hope these tips were helpful for taking the best photos of your child! After the photo shoot is over collect all of the best pictures to preserve and cherish forever in one of our board book templates or create a custom board book from scratch!

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